Mixolydian b5 b9 tetrads

  • Crumb
    Crumb

    3 posts
    Signed up the 2021-07-02

    On 2021-09-13 at 11:22

    As I am studying the double harmonic major scale and I come to it's fifth mode, mixolydian b5 b9, I am trying to name the tetrads built from each step of the scale.
    In the key of G the scale is G-Ab-B-C-Db-E-F
    So, looking at the third step the tetrad notes are B-Db-F-Ab.
    How is this chord named?
  • Stef-jazz-guitar-licks
    Stef-jazz-guitar-licks
    Moderator

    19 posts
    Signed up the 2017-11-10

    On 2021-09-13 at 15:15

    Hello,
    To make it simple, B Db F Ab is actually Db7 with the seventh in the bass. Otherwise you can call it Bsus2add13b5.
    You can also check Ian Ring's website. https://ianring.com/musictheory/scales/2483
    Thanks
    Stef
  • Crumb
    Crumb

    3 posts
    Signed up the 2021-07-02

    On 2021-09-13 at 23:18

    I understand my mistake. I was trying to choose a name to describe the tetrad built on the 3rd step of mixolydian b5 b9 forgetting the most basic purpose of the name is to communicate the notes and the intervals between them. Not to describe the scale or the key. (A silly mistake)
    To make sure I am understanding correctly, the 6th step of the scale also gave me problems (maybe no longer)
    In key of G the notes are E-G-B-Db.
    This is a Emin6 or Emin(add13) or Dbmin7(b5).
    Correct?
  • Stef-jazz-guitar-licks
    Stef-jazz-guitar-licks
    Moderator

    19 posts
    Signed up the 2017-11-10

    On 2021-09-14 at 08:37

    Yes that's correct :
    Emin6 / Emin (add13) : E (1) - G (b3) - B (5) - Db (C# theoretically) (6 or 13).
    Dbm7b5 (half-diminished) : Db (1) - E (b3) - G (b5) - B (b7).
  • Crumb
    Crumb

    3 posts
    Signed up the 2021-07-02

    On 2021-09-14 at 11:11

    Cool.
    So that does lead me to one more question.
    If I am composing a song and I run into this situation where I have multiple choices how to name a chord, do I then take into consideration the key and scale and try to associate the chord in diatonic terms or pick the most simplified name? Is there a rule to follow or perhaps only one name that would seem right to a player reading my chart?
    ( this may be a factor in my earlier confusion)

    ... And I'd like to add that jazz-guitar-licks is easily the largest source of knowledge I have found that I can understand. My level of understanding music theory before coming here was basic triads and an occasional dominant 7th thrown in. I only knew major, minor open chords and their dominant 7th fingering. I only knew major and minor boxed scale patterns and the Blues scale (I thought it was the only Blues scale) I understood there was melodic and harmonic minor scales but I never learned them. And on top of that I was only aware of the 7 modes of major.
    I have learned an enormous amount of things here. I've learned things I didn't even know that I didn't know I needed to learn. My head is spinning from everything I've learned and there is still many more things available to me that I need to learn.
    This site is literally AWESOME. Thank you
  • Stef-jazz-guitar-licks
    Stef-jazz-guitar-licks
    Moderator

    19 posts
    Signed up the 2017-11-10

    On 2021-09-14 at 15:17

    Thanks for the kind words
    To answer your question, you have to name the chords in relation with the key and scales.

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