jazz guitar lesson

  • How To Practice Scales On Guitar

    Tips and Tricks To Help You Practice Scales

    When you want to master jazz language, one of the first things to do is to learn scales and modes. Any guitar student need to memorize the fingerings, the names and the composition of each scale.

    It is important to make the difference between the main types of musical scales (major, minor, augmented, symmetric and diminished), important to know what scale works with a particular chord.

    In the long run the practice of scales can be confusing and seems a never-ending. Here are some tricks and tips for practicing scales while developing your musical ear, your guitar technique and your theoretical knowledge.

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  • 12 Scales You Can Play Over a Dominant 7th Chord

    The first thing to do before starting exploring the twelve different scales shown in this lesson is to understand how to build a basic dominant 7th chord and what its role is.

    What's a Dominant 7 Chord?

    A Dominant 7th chords is made up of a root / tonic (1), a major third (3), a perfect fifth (5) and minor seventh (b7). It is one of the most versatile chords. It is considered as a major chord because of the major third (3).

     Indeed, the 3rd tell us if the chord is minor or major. The minor seventh (b7) indicates whether the sound wants to move or not (resolve) to another chord. Usually dominant chords tend to resolve to a chord down a perfect fifth (or a chord up a perfect fourth).

    C dominant 7th chord  C E G Bb
    Intervals 1 3 5 b7
    Related Arpeggio 1 3 5 b7

     

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  • The Seven Modes of The Major Scale

    Modes of the major scale guitar lessonWhat Are Ecclesiastical Modes?

    Ecclesiastical modes, also named "Greek modes"or "church modes" or "Gregorian modes" formed in the Middle Ages a set of scales whose use has weakened because of the appearance of the major / minor tonal system. 

    Several centuries later these modes have reappeared. They are very used in jazz improvisation as scale of chords and modal playing.

    This lesson explains how are built modes and how to play them on guitar.

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  • Kenny Burrell - Midnight Blue | 10 Dominant Jazz Blues Licks For Beginners

    Kenny BurrellKenneth Earl "Kenny" Burrell (July 31, 1931) is an American jazz guitarist from Detroit. With Wes Montgomery and Charlie Christian he is one of the most influential jazz guitarist, epitome of good taste and unique swing. His guitar sound is clear, refined and raw, easy to recognize. His guitar playing is unique, grounded in bebop and blues, the man is able to play both blues licks and swinging bebop lines.

    He has collaborated with many artists as sideman (Dizzy Gillespie, "Jimmy Hammond" Smith, Billy Holiday, Milt Jackson, Stanley Turrentine, Stan Getz, Chet Baker, The Jones Brothers...) and recorded many solo albums including the famous "Midnight blue" (Blue note, 1963).

    He has played Gibson guitars (ES-175, super 400) for the majority of is career plugged into a Fender deluxe amp.

    Midnight blue

    How smooth can jazz guitar get ? Right here is the answer. Midnight Blue (released in 1963 by blue note records and recorded by Rudy Van Gelder) is one of those records that you just put on, sit back and relaxis. In this album Kenny Burrell is accompanied by the tenor-saxophonist Stanley Turrentine in a pianoless quintet that also includes Ray Barretto on congas (a highly regarded bandleader in his own right who injects a dash of Latin flavor), Major Holley on bass and Bill English on drums. Midnight blue is considered one of the best recordings of Kenny Burrell's career.

    1. Chitlins Con Carne (5:25)Midnight blue - Kenny Burrell
    2. Mule (6:53)
    3. Soul Lament (2:39)
    4. Midnight Blue (3:59)
    5. Wavy Gravy (5:43)
    6. Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You (4:21)
    7. Saturday Night Blues (6:13)
    8. Kenny’s Sound (4:39) 
    9. K Twist (3:35) 

    This album is very useful for basic call-and-response type blues phrasing, recommend for anyone trying to learn playing jazz blues on guitar.

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